Facts & Figures - according to EIA data

*Please note that this information uses the State Profile and Energy Estimates, last updated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration in July 2013.

Alabama:

• In the Yellowhammer State, coal is an important part of a diverse energy mix.

• Average retail price: 9.02 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 21st lowest

• Coal: 31%

• Natural gas: 31%

• Nuclear: 27%

• Hydro: 8%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Alabama gets 31 percent of its electricity from coal.

Alaska:

• In The Last Frontier state, lack of coal use contributes to high energy prices.

• Average retail price: 16.52 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: second highest

• Coal: 9%

• Natural gas: 54%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 23%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 12%

• Alaska gets just 9 percent of its electricity from coal, which is one of the reasons why the state has the second highest energy prices in the nation.

Arizona:

• The Grand Canyon State, below national average for coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 10.16 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 16th highest

• Coal: 39%

• Natural gas: 24%

• Nuclear: 29%

• Hydro: 5%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Arizona gets 39 percent of its electricity from coal. It is the 16th most expensive state for energy prices.

Arkansas:

• In The Natural State, coal helps residents see low energy prices.

• Average retail price: 7.82 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: sixth lowest

• Coal: 53%

• Natural gas: 20%

• Nuclear: 20%

• Hydro: 5%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other sources: 0%

• Arkansas gets 53 percent of its electricity from coal, helping it to be the sixth least expensive state for energy prices in the nation.

California:

• The Golden State, below national average for coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 14.57 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: fourth highest

• Coal: 1%

• Natural gas: 59%

• Nuclear: 9%

• Hydro: 12%

• Other renewables: 18%

• Other sources: 1%

• California gets just 1 percent of its electricity from coal. The state has the fourth highest energy prices in the nation.

Colorado:

• The Centennial State uses coal for more than 60 percent of its power.

• Average retail price: 9.80 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 18th highest

• Coal: 64%

• Natural gas: 20%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 14%

• Other sources: 0%

• Colorado gets 64 percent of its power from coal.

Connecticut:

• The Nutmeg State, below national average for coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 15.68 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: third highest

• Coal: 2%

• Natural gas: 44%

• Nuclear: 48%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 3%

• Connecticut, which gets just 2 percent of its power from coal, is the third most expensive state in the nation for electricity.

Delaware:

• The First State gets less than a quarter of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 10.98 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 13th highest

• Coal: 21%

• Natural gas: 75%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 2%

• Delaware gets 21 percent of its electricity from coal. There are no nuclear plants in Delaware, meaning coal will continue to be an integral part of the state’s electricity mix.

Florida:

• The Sunshine State, below national average for coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 10.3 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 15th highest

• Coal: 21%

• Natural gas: 62%

• Nuclear: 12%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 1%

• Florida gets 21 percent of its electricity from coal and is the 15th most expensive state for energy.

Georgia:

• The Peach State has a diverse energy mix, which leads to its low cost for electricity.

• Average retail price: 9.53 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 20th lowest

• Coal: 33%

• Natural gas: 34%

• Nuclear: 27%

• Hydro: 3%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 33 percent of Georgia’s electricity.

Hawaii:

• The Aloha State is the most expensive for electricity.

• Average retail price: 33.27 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: most expensive

• Coal: 14%

• Natural gas: 0%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 11%

• Other sources: 74%

• Hawaii gets just 14 percent of its electricity from coal. Using petroleum to generate electricity, as Hawaii does, is an expensive way to get power.

Idaho:

• In The Gem State, reliance on hydropower makes state unusual.

• Average retail price: 7.61 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: fourth lowest

• Coal: less than 1% (0.5%)

• Natural gas: 21.5%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 58%

• Other renewables: 20%

• Other sources: 0%

• Due to its vast hydropower industry, Idaho has the fourth lowest electricity in the nation. However, most states do not have this option.

Illinois:

• The Prairie State gets just under half its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 7.99 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: eighth lowest

• Coal: 43%

• Natural gas: 3%

• Nuclear: 48%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 5%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 43 percent of the electricity in Illinois.

Indiana:

• Coal powers The Hoosier State, keeping electricity prices low.

• Average retail price: 8.63 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 15th lowest

• Coal: 84%

• Natural gas: 8%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other sources: 4%

• Coal provides 84 percent of Indiana’s electricity and helps make it the 15th least expensive state in the nation for power.

Iowa:

• Powered by coal, The Hawkeye State enjoys inexpensive electricity.

• Average retail price: 8.12 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: tenth lowest

• Coal: 59%

• Natural gas: 2%

• Nuclear: 9%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 28%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 59 percent of Iowa’s electricity.

Kansas:

• The Sunflower State relies on coal to keep electricity prices below norm.

• Average retail price: 9.57 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 19th highest

• Coal: 61%

• Natural gas: 4%

• Nuclear: 15%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 20%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 61 percent of electricity in Kansas.

Kentucky:

• Coal powers The Bluegrass State, resulting in the second lowest electricity rates.

• Average retail price: 7.54 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: second lowest

• Coal: 93%

• Natural gas: 2%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 4%

• Other renewables: 0%

• Other sources: 2%

• Kentucky’s abundance of coal helps the state have some of the least expensive power in the nation. Coal provides 93 percent of Kentucky’s electricity.

Louisiana:

• The Pelican State is below the national average for coal use.

• Average retail price: 8 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: ninth lowest

• Coal: 21%

• Natural gas: 52%

• Nuclear: 17%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 7%

• Coal provides just 21 percent of Louisiana’s power.

Maine:

• The Pine Tree State uses almost no coal use and has higher than average electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 11.87 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 10th highest

• Coal: 0.5%

• Natural gas: 34.5%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 29%

• Other renewables: 32%

• Other sources: 4%

• Maine has the 10th highest electricity prices in the nation.

Maryland:

• The Old Line State gets just under half its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 11.65 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 11th highest

• Coal: 44%

• Natural gas: 8%

• Nuclear: 40%

• Hydro: 4%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides 44 percent of Maryland’s power.

Massachusetts:

• The Bay State, below national average for coal use, has high electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 14.51 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: fifth highest

• Coal: 12%

• Natural gas: 63%

• Nuclear: 13%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 6%

• Other sources: 4%

• Coal provides 12 percent of the power in Massachusetts. The state has the fifth highest electricity prices in the nation.

Michigan:

• The Wolverine State gets more than half of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 11.26 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 12th highest

• Coal: 54%

• Natural gas: 12%

• Nuclear: 28%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 5%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides 54 percent of Michigan’s power.

Minnesota:

• The North Star State, gets a lot of its power from coal, helps keep electricity prices low.

• Average retail price: 9.52 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 29th lowest

• Coal: 46%

• Natural gas: 13%

• Nuclear: 21%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 19%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides 46 percent of Minnesota’s power.

Mississippi:

• The Magnolia State has below-average coal use.

• Average retail price: 9.15 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 24th lowest

• Coal: 16%

• Natural gas: 60%

• Nuclear: 21%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 16 percent of Mississippi’s power. The state has the 24th lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Missouri:

• The Show Me State, with more than 80 percent of its power from coal, keeps electricity prices low.

• Average retail price: 8.96 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 19th lowest

• Coal: 83%

• Natural gas: 5%

• Nuclear: 9%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 1%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 83% of Missouri's power. The state has the 19th-lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Montana:

• The Treasure State gets more than half its power from coal, keeping electricity prices low.

• Average retail price: 8.58 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 14th lowest

• Coal: 53%

• Natural gas: 2%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 36%

• Other renewables: 6%

• Other sources: 3%

• Coal provides 53 percent of Montana’s power. It has the 14th lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Nebraska:

• Powered by coal, The Cornhusker State enjoys low electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 8.69 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 16th lowest

• Coal: 72%

• Natural gas: 1%

• Nuclear: 18%

• Hydro: 3%

• Other renewables: 5%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 72 percent of Nebraska’s power. The state has the 16th lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Nevada:

• The Silver State is below the national average for coal use.

• Average retail price: 9.04 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 22nd lowest

• Coal: 14%

• Natural gas: 68%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 7%

• Other renewables: 10%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 14 percent of Nevada’s power. The state has the 22nd lowest electricity prices in the nation.

New Hampshire

• The Granite State, with below average coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 14.31 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: seventh highest

• Coal: 7%

• Natural gas: 21%

• Nuclear: 55%

• Hydro: 7%

• Other renewables: 8%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides just 7 percent of New Hampshire’s power. The state has the seventh highest electricity prices in the nation.

New Jersey:

• The Garden State, with below average coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 13.7 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: ninth highest

• Coal: 3%

• Natural gas: 42%

• Nuclear: 52%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides just 3 percent of New Jersey’s power. The state has the ninth highest electricity prices in the nation.

New Mexico:

• The Land of Enchantment gets more than 60 percent of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 9.24 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 28th lowest

• Coal: 67%

• Natural gas: 25%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 7%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 67 percent of New Mexico’s power.

New York:

• The Empire State, with below average coal use, has high prices.

• Average retail price: 15.62 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: third highest

• Coal: 4%

• Natural gas: 39%

• Nuclear: 33%

• Hydro: 18%

• Other renewables: 4%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides just 4 percent of New York’s power. The state has the third highest electricity prices in the nation.

North Carolina:

• The Tar Heel State uses a diverse fuel mix for their energy portfolio.

• Average retail price: 9.18 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 24th highest

• Coal: 38%

• Natural gas: 22%

• Nuclear: 32%

• Hydro: 5%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 38 percent of North Carolina’s power.

North Dakota:

• In The Peace Garden State, coal provides nearly 79 percent of its electricity.

• Average retail price: 8.19 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: twelfth lowest

• Coal: 79%

• Natural gas: 0%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 5%

• Other renewables: 16%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 79 percent of North Dakota’s power. The state has the twelfth lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Ohio:

• The Buckeye State gets nearly 70 percent of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 9.16 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 25th highest

• Coal: 69%

• Natural gas: 15%

• Nuclear: 12%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 1%

• Other sources: 2%

• Coal provides 69 percent of Ohio’s power.

Oklahoma:

• The Sooner State uses over forty percent of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 7.81 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 5th lowest

• Coal: 41%

• Natural gas: 41%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 3%

• Other renewables: 15%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 41 percent of Oklahoma’s power.

Oregon:

• The Beaver State has below average coal use.

• Average retail price: 8.39 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 13th lowest

• Coal: 6%

• Natural gas: 24%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 56%

• Other renewables: 14%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides just 6 percent of Oregon’s power.

Pennsylvania:

• The Keystone State's coal use is above the national average.

• Average retail price: 9.83 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 17th highest

• Coal: 40%

• Natural gas: 22%

• Nuclear: 35%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 3%

• Other Sources: 1%

• Coal provides 40 percent of Pennsylvania’s power.

Rhode Island:

• The Ocean State has no coal-generated electricity; high electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 13.91 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: eighth highest

• Coal: 0%

• Natural gas: 98%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 1%

• Rhode Island gets nearly all of its power from natural gas and it has the eighth highest electricity prices in the nation.

South Carolina:

• The Palmetto State has below national average for coal use.

• Average retail price: 9.14 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 23rd lowest

• Coal: 26%

• Natural gas: 13%

• Nuclear: 57%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 26 percent of South Carolina’s power. The state has the 23rd lowest electricity prices in the nation.

South Dakota:

• Coal provides 29 percent of Mount Rushmore State’s power.

• Average retail price: 8.83 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 18th lowest

• Coal: 29%

• Natural gas: 6%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 39%

• Other renewables: 26%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 29 percent of South Dakota’s power. The state has the 18th lowest electricity prices in the nation.

Tennessee:

• The Volunteer State gets less than half its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 9.22 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 23rd highest

• Coal: 41%

• Natural gas: 6%

• Nuclear: 36%

• Hydro: 15%

• Other renewables: 1%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 41 percent of Tennessee’s power. The state has the 23rd highest electricity prices in the nation.

Texas:

• The Lone Star State has below average coal use; high prices.

• Average retail price: 8.77 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 17th lowest

• Coal: 34%

• Natural gas: 47%

• Nuclear: 9%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 9%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides only 34 percent of electricity in Texas. The state has the 17th lowest power costs in the country.

Utah:

• The Beehive State is powered by coal and enjoys low electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 8.18 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: eleventh lowest

• Coal: 81%

• Natural gas: 15%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 81 percent of Utah’s power. The state has the eleventh lowest electricity prices in the country.

Vermont:

• The Green Mountain State has no coal use, high prices.

• Average retail price: 14.46 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: sixth highest

• Coal: 0%

• Natural gas: 0%

• Nuclear: 70%

• Hydro: 20%

• Other renewables: 10%

• Other sources: 0%

• Vermont does not use coal to generate electricity. This is part of the reason why its energy costs are the sixth highest in the nation.

Virginia:

• In The Old Dominion State, coal provides nearly 30 percent of its power.

• Average retail price: 9.01 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 20th lowest

• Coal: 28%

• Natural gas: 29%

• Nuclear: 38%

• Hydro: 0%

• Other renewables: 4%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides 28% of Virginia’s power.

Washington, state:

• The Evergreen State is below national average for coal use.

• Average retail price: 7.06 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: least expensive

• Coal: 6%

• Natural gas: 10%

• Nuclear: 7%

• Hydro: 69%

• Other renewables: 8%

• Other Sources: 1%

• Coal provides just 6 percent of the state of Washington's power, but it has a strong hydropower industry. However, most states do not have the option to use high amounts of hydropower.

West Virginia:

• Powered by coal, The Mountain State has low electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 7.91 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 7th lowest

• Coal: 95%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 2%

• Other sources: 0%

• Coal provides 95 percent of West Virginia’s power, helping it to have the 7th lowest electricity in the nation.

Wisconsin:

• The Badger State gets most of its power from coal.

• Average retail price: 10.64 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: 14th highest

• Coal: 62%

• Natural gas: 13%

• Nuclear: 18%

• Hydro: 2%

• Other renewables: 5%

• Other sources: 1%

• Coal provides 62 percent of Wisconsin’s power.

Wyoming:

• The Cowboy State is powered by coal and has low electricity prices.

• Average retail price: 7.55 cents per kilowatt hour

• U.S. rank: third lowest

• Coal: 89%

• Natural gas: 1%

• Nuclear: 0%

• Hydro: 1%

• Other renewables: 8%

• Other Sources: 1%

• Coal provides 89 percent of Wyoming’s power, helping the state have the third lowest electricity prices in the nation.



Notes:

• Retail price listed is equal to “cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh)” in 2013

• U.S. average retail price for electricity was 10.08 cents per kWh in 2013

• Retail price state ranking: 1 is the cheapest, 50 is the most expensive

• Generation percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number

• “Other Renewables” includes wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

• “Other Sources” includes other gases, Petroleum Coke, Petroleum Liquid, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, hydrogen, purchased steam, sulfur, tire-derived fuel, and other miscellaneous energy sources



For more information on the use of coal and other fuels for generating electricity, go to: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epm/epm_sum.html